Friday, August 10, 2012

Containers That Worked

Believe me I have some that did not work in this summer's heat.

Coleus Redhead, Dichondra and Cordyline
This one never even had a wilt during the intense heat because they are in very large containers, less chance of the soil drying.  I am going to try to invest in a couple more larger containers for next year.

Supertunias Bubblegum and Bordeaux
Not all Supertunias perform like these two!  Even the Supertunias need a little trimming and fertilizer this time of year.

This is a basket that I put together early in the season, never had a chance.  The Japanese beetles ate everything in it, Sweet Caroline sweet potato vine, beautiful geranium and Cranberry Crush superbells.  It is just starting to revive for the fall season.

When I first planted this I did not have much hope for it being a great container.  However, it has become my favorite, Caladium Aaron with Orange Guinea Impatiens.  I really like this caladium, more petite and stronger than many of the other varieties.  It hangs on the fence under my neighbor's old lilac tree.

This is the one hanging basket that I purchased at Home Depot.  Each year I have brought home one of their tuberous begonia baskets and so far they have not disappointed.  Many of the other with overgrown plantings have not been a good investment.

Mystic Illusion Dahlia and Phantom Petunia
I have a couple of other plants in here but I can just imagine how spectacular this would have been in a larger container.  It dried out quickly and needed daily watering, sometimes more.

I love hayracks on a little shed, but oh what a chore it is to keep the plants alive.  The soil dries out too quickly and I had to pull the zinnias and put in the superbells.  I am totally rethinking this one for next year, how about cactus?

These are the nasturtiums in my veggie garden growing up an obliesk.  They are infringing somewhat on my peppers, but I hate to pull them out.

I should have just stuck with the Algerian Ivy, the impatiens hardly bloomed all season.

Rex Begonia
This is a plant that likes the heat, formerly a houseplant but being used more and more in the outside garden.  We wintered this over inside from last year.


Coleus Sedona and Blackheart Sweet Potato Vine

I have kept it pretty simple this year, no more than three types of plants in a container.  We all know that some of those multi-flowered containers begin to show stress half way through the summer.  It is always upsetting to see some of the lovely plants in an expensive container drying up when the rest look fine.  I am almost ready to go to the single plant look if it withstands the high temperatures!



25 comments:

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Bernie H said...

You've hit on exactly the reason why I usually only do one planting per container. It's simpler and less stress. Sometimes I put two together, but only two that I know will perform equally as well as each other, because as you point out, if one plant starts looking horrible while the others power on, the entire container looks dreadful.

I do so love your Redhead/Dichondra combination. It looks fabulous. The Caladium/New Guinea Impatiens basket looks fantastic as well. Of course these are all plants that are so familiar to me, but even these plants wouldn't survive in even part shade during our summers here.

Lona said...

Your containers look beautiful still Eileen. I wish I had more this summer regardless of the continuous watering. It would have been nice to have them in the now dried and empty spots in the beds.

My Garden Diaries said...

Beautiful containers! I have enjoyed finding your blog!

Darla said...

Very, very nice combinations here!

Leslie's Garden said...

You have a lot of wonderful containers, but the one that stole my heart is the first one, with the coleus and the dichondra, and whatever the tall spiky plant is, I can't remember it's name. I usually grow Purple Fountain Grass in my tall urn, with sweet potato vine and impatience, but the last few years I haven't been very happy with it. Next year I am going to duplicate your coleus pot and I can't wait!!

Zoey said...

Hi Eileen,
Wow—love that red coleus planter!

I also find the Mystic Illusion Dahlia and Phantom Petunia quite interesting. I like the dark dahlia foliage with the dark petunia edges.

I understand totally about the hayracks drying out. I did not even plant mine this year for that exact reason.

Sweet Home and Garden Carolina said...

Fantastic containers as usual, Eileen. I love coleus and used to plant it in my Chicago garden every year.

Gatsbys Gardens said...

Hi Teuvo thank you for visiting, come again!

Eileen

Gatsbys Gardens said...

Hi Bernie,

We will need to take ideas from your plantings in the future if we continue with these hot summers.

Eileen

Gatsbys Gardens said...

Hi Lona,

It amazes me that some of the houseplants do better outside than the annuals we have used in the past.

Eileen

Gatsbys Gardens said...

Thanks for visiting Garden Diaries.

Eileen

Gatsbys Gardens said...

Hi Leslie,

Coleus has been a real winner this year in the garden, some better performers than others. Dichondra will take the heat and drought.

Eileen

Gatsbys Gardens said...

Hi Zoey,

The dahlia has done great, wish I had the whole combination in a larger container, roots must have gotten huge.

Eileen

Gatsbys Gardens said...

Hi Carolyn,

I very rarely planted coleus years ago but with all the new varieties it has become a favorite.

Eileen

garden girl said...

I loved the simplicity and elegance of many of the single-plant containers in P. Allen Smith's gardens. Being in Arkansas they were even hotter this summer than here. He just groups single-plant containers together, and voila - lots of great color combos and textures.

How about succulents in the hayracks? There are so many beautiful colors and textures, and even some that make very fine 'spillers.'

In spite of the tough summer, you've got lots of pretty, healthy-looking containers Eileen!

Kimberley at Cosmos and Cleome said...

Like Garden Girl above, I was also thinking of succulents for your hayrack containers!

Last fall I found lovely large containers at greatly reduced clearance prices at our local Agway. I'll be checking the clearance area again this fall!

I am very slowly learning to limit how much variety I put in each container.

I decided today that one way to combat the "August lull" in my garden's color is to keep some pots of colorful annuals (geraniums, calenula. . .) in reserve, and then just put them in the boring spaces!

Beth said...

Eileen, I love the yellow begonias, and the hayracks on your shed. We use self-watering planters (Gardeners' Supply) as well as moisture retention soil. The self-watering planters have a reservoir that you fill with water, and they tell you when they need to be refilled. As far as I am concerned, you are the queen of the containers! I always love yours!

Jennifer said...

Eileen, Your container planting never fail to impress me! Your notes are very helpful and I will keep them in mind for my containers next year.
I have a Redhead coleus this summer as well, and though I have had to keep it watered, I am very pleased with it. I also have nasturtiums, but yours have more flowers than mine. My flowers our buried in a sea of leaves. Any ideas as to where I have gone wrong? Love that Rex begonia.

MrBrownThumb said...

I love the foliage on that dahlia. I don't know why I've never gotten one considering how many year I've been drooling after those dark hues.

Gatsbys Gardens said...

Hi Linda,

There are some really lovely succulents. I have some in pots on the south side and they have done great all summer.

Eileen

Gatsbys Gardens said...

Hi Kimberly,

I have noticed that the nurseries get in batches of new annuals in July for that replanting thing that happens when they start looking scraggley.

Eileen

Balisha said...

Hi Eileen,
I have been watching what has done well and what hasn't, both in my yard and others.
Our little nursery in town looks so depressing. Everything is just hanging on for dear life. I've started removing some things that haven't done well and will replace them with fall flowers.
You must have really watered those hay racks.That first coleus is just beautiful.
Balisha

Karen said...

Eileen, I'm going to be referring to this post next spring when trying to determine what looks 'good' together. You have such amazing talent and your containers are always stunning. None of mine look very good this year after all the heat and drought, but yours sure do!

CanadianGardenJoy said...

OMG ! Eileen girl your containers are amazing ! I love the coleus ones especially too .. I usually have coleus out in the front ..but even having put 2 together half heartedly .. I just didn't seem to be interested in them this year .. the main gardens have taken so much time and worry in this drought we had .. this morning is sunny but a bit cooler .. and we had rain ..
I totally am in love with your containers girl .. in fact I'll take them all plus your gardens ! LOL
Joy